Canterbury Tales in Mexico

Program #1458

MAGDELENA PILGRIMAGE–Like a Migration

ambience
In the spring and fall, many animals set forth on their annual migrations. And it’s also a time when humans, too, may feel the urge to travel together en masse – as pilgrims. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, with a special program from our archives.

This week, in honor of St. Francis, there’s a pilgrimage from Nogales, Arizona to Magdalena, Mexico. And, for Jim Griffith, of the Southwest Folklore Center, it resonates with another human migration.

“Well Jeffrey Chaucer wrote a poem called The Canterbury Tales, in which he goes on to describe all the things that happen in April. Nature is waking everybody up to such an extent that folk long to go on pilgrimage. And I think that’s an answer not only for his pilgrimage which was in April to Canterbury from London, but also to some extent an answer for this pilgrimage. Paraphrasing Mr. Chaucer, you can say, ‘When October with its relatively cool winds has taken the real edge off the fierce desert heat. When it’s cool enough that you can stand to walk around outdoors. When the summer rains have stopped and the roads aren’t a sea of mud and it’s pretty easy to move. Then folks want to move.’ And in this case, they want to move on a spiritually sanctioned trip.”

Like Chaucer’s pilgrims, the worshippers walking to Magdalena, Mexico this week are journeying to pay their respects to a religious tradition, and to share the kinship and company of others, gathered together for a common purpose.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. I’m Jim Metzner.
music

Canterbury Tales in Mexico

The fall, well-known as a time of animal migrations, is also a time of human pilgrimage.
Air Date:10/06/2021
Scientist:
Transcript:

Program #1458 MAGDELENA PILGRIMAGE--Like a Migration ambience In the spring and fall, many animals set forth on their annual migrations. And it's also a time when humans, too, may feel the urge to travel together en masse - as pilgrims. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, with a special program from our archives. This week, in honor of St. Francis, there's a pilgrimage from Nogales, Arizona to Magdalena, Mexico. And, for Jim Griffith, of the Southwest Folklore Center, it resonates with another human migration. "Well Jeffrey Chaucer wrote a poem called The Canterbury Tales, in which he goes on to describe all the things that happen in April. Nature is waking everybody up to such an extent that folk long to go on pilgrimage. And I think that's an answer not only for his pilgrimage which was in April to Canterbury from London, but also to some extent an answer for this pilgrimage. Paraphrasing Mr. Chaucer, you can say, 'When October with its relatively cool winds has taken the real edge off the fierce desert heat. When it's cool enough that you can stand to walk around outdoors. When the summer rains have stopped and the roads aren't a sea of mud and it's pretty easy to move. Then folks want to move.' And in this case, they want to move on a spiritually sanctioned trip." Like Chaucer's pilgrims, the worshippers walking to Magdalena, Mexico this week are journeying to pay their respects to a religious tradition, and to share the kinship and company of others, gathered together for a common purpose. Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. I'm Jim Metzner. music