Magdalena Pilgrimage

This week, along the highway that runs south from the bordertown of Nogales, Arizona, there’s a sixty mile pilgrimage to the Mexican village of Magdalena. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, with a special program from our archives.

“People walk down every year from the border at Nogales, along the highway for some of the way and along back roads for some of the way, all the way to Magdalena as an act of devotion to Saint Francis Xavier, who’s statue is in the church in Magdalena. ”

Jim Griffith is coordinator of the Southwest folklore Center at the University of Arizona library.

“Right now as we talk, hundreds, if not thousands of people are on the road. And after you’re on your feet for forty five out of the sixty miles, you’re pretty sore, and pretty warm and pretty thirsty. And there are people all along the road, not selling, but giving away food and various kinds of drink, and care of various kinds to the pilgrims as their religious obligation to the saint.”

“In Magdalena Sonora, while the church is the focus of the pilgrimage, why after that obligation is finished with, which maybe is two hours standing in line and then a minute and a half with the saint statue itself. After that’s done there’s everything else in the world to do. There are Mexican folk and popular musicians of every possible kind. There is all sorts of wonderful stuff to eat. There are all the different kinds of entertainment and stuff to buy that goes on as the secular side of the pilgrimage.”

This program from our archives was originally broadcast in 1997. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Magdalena Pilgrimage

Every October, there's a sixty mile pilgrimage to the Mexican village of Magdalena in honor of St. Francis.
Air Date:10/04/2021
Scientist:
Transcript:

This week, along the highway that runs south from the bordertown of Nogales, Arizona, there's a sixty mile pilgrimage to the Mexican village of Magdalena. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, with a special program from our archives. "People walk down every year from the border at Nogales, along the highway for some of the way and along back roads for some of the way, all the way to Magdalena as an act of devotion to Saint Francis Xavier, who's statue is in the church in Magdalena. " Jim Griffith is coordinator of the Southwest folklore Center at the University of Arizona library. "Right now as we talk, hundreds, if not thousands of people are on the road. And after you're on your feet for forty five out of the sixty miles, you're pretty sore, and pretty warm and pretty thirsty. And there are people all along the road, not selling, but giving away food and various kinds of drink, and care of various kinds to the pilgrims as their religious obligation to the saint." "In Magdalena Sonora, while the church is the focus of the pilgrimage, why after that obligation is finished with, which maybe is two hours standing in line and then a minute and a half with the saint statue itself. After that's done there's everything else in the world to do. There are Mexican folk and popular musicians of every possible kind. There is all sorts of wonderful stuff to eat. There are all the different kinds of entertainment and stuff to buy that goes on as the secular side of the pilgrimage." This program from our archives was originally broadcast in 1997. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.