Statues of Wonderland

23-Sep-21
G.A. (Moby) Mudge
Statues of Central Park

Mudge: The thing that most surprised me was the number of statues in the park that I had walked by without paying any attention to.

We’re in Central Park with author and photographer Moby Mudge. Over time, he began paying paying special attention to the park’s 60 statues by photographing them. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Mudge: As you walk by a statue, the questions just scream at you. Why is this statue there? Who put it there? Why were they inspired to fund the creation of this statue? Who was the sculptor? Where is the story in the history of the Park, New York City, the country, even the world?

One story that has weaved its spell over Central Park is Alice in Wonderland. There are two statues here with an Alice-inspired theme.

Mudge: Each of the statues honored a woman, a very different woman. The Sophie Irene Loeb fountain honored a journalist and social worker in the city who campaigned on behalf of widows and destitute children. The Margarita Delacorte Memorial honored the wife of a very successful businessman and philanthropist.

The popular Delacorte statue was inspired by the drawings of Sir John Tenniel in the Alice books, but with a twist.

Mudge: One of the woodcarvings has the caterpillar sitting on top of a mushroom, looking down at Alice, saying contemptuously, “Who Are You?” Now, in the statue, Alice is on top of the mushroom. She’s Queen of the mushroom, if not the park. The caterpillar grovels on the ground behind her.

Moby Mudge is the author of “Alice in Central Park – Statues in Wonderland.” I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Statues of Wonderland

Alice merits two statues in the park, and the caterpillar gets a make-over!
Air Date:09/23/2021
Scientist:G.A. (Moby) Mudge
Transcript:

23-Sep-21 G.A. (Moby) Mudge Statues of Central Park Mudge: The thing that most surprised me was the number of statues in the park that I had walked by without paying any attention to. We're in Central Park with author and photographer Moby Mudge. Over time, he began paying paying special attention to the park's 60 statues by photographing them. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Mudge: As you walk by a statue, the questions just scream at you. Why is this statue there? Who put it there? Why were they inspired to fund the creation of this statue? Who was the sculptor? Where is the story in the history of the Park, New York City, the country, even the world? One story that has weaved its spell over Central Park is Alice in Wonderland. There are two statues here with an Alice-inspired theme. Mudge: Each of the statues honored a woman, a very different woman. The Sophie Irene Loeb fountain honored a journalist and social worker in the city who campaigned on behalf of widows and destitute children. The Margarita Delacorte Memorial honored the wife of a very successful businessman and philanthropist. The popular Delacorte statue was inspired by the drawings of Sir John Tenniel in the Alice books, but with a twist. Mudge: One of the woodcarvings has the caterpillar sitting on top of a mushroom, looking down at Alice, saying contemptuously, "Who Are You?" Now, in the statue, Alice is on top of the mushroom. She's Queen of the mushroom, if not the park. The caterpillar grovels on the ground behind her. Moby Mudge is the author of "Alice in Central Park – Statues in Wonderland." I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.