A Blast of the Ram’s Horn

08-Sep-21
Rabbi Eli Gewirtz
ROSH HASHANAH – Shofar

Here’s a program from our archives.
ambience: Shofar

We’re listening to the sounds of the Shofar– a blast on a Ram’s horn which signals the start of the Jewish New Years celebration, Rosh Hashanah.
I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Gewirtz: When God created Man, God created man as a lifeless being, and only afterwards injected a blast of wind which reached his inner core, which gave him the soul of life.”

Rabbi Eli Gewirtz is the National Director of Partners in Torah.

Gewirtz:During the course of the year we tend to get caught up in our daily routine, and tend to get away from that soul and that purity. We cloud ourselves with an outer veneer and tend to get separated from our spiritual selves. Once a year, on anniversary of the creation of Adam, God gives us an opportunity to get back to ourselves, who we really are. The howling sound of the Shofar causes us to tremble, to shake us up a little bit and to bring us back to the state of the unblemished soul.

Rosh Hashanah is a day of judgment and by sounding the shofar we are asking for that judgment, and what’s that all about? Life is the ability to grow. We don’t want to after an entire year, from this Rosh Hashanah to last Rosh Hashanah and say that we are still the same person. So we’re saying next year, by this time I’d like to look back and say ‘I’m a better person.’

Rosh Hashanah begins this week and it marks the start of a ten day period known as the High Holy Days.
We’ve been listening to a program from our archives. If you want to hear more, check out our podcast. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

A Blast of the Ram's Horn

The call of the shofar marks the start of the Jewish New Year and reminds observers to look inward.
Air Date:09/08/2021
Scientist:Rabbi Eli Gewirtz
Transcript:

08-Sep-21 Rabbi Eli Gewirtz ROSH HASHANAH - Shofar Here's a program from our archives. ambience: Shofar We're listening to the sounds of the Shofar-- a blast on a Ram's horn which signals the start of the Jewish New Years celebration, Rosh Hashanah. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Gewirtz: When God created Man, God created man as a lifeless being, and only afterwards injected a blast of wind which reached his inner core, which gave him the soul of life." Rabbi Eli Gewirtz is the National Director of Partners in Torah. Gewirtz:During the course of the year we tend to get caught up in our daily routine, and tend to get away from that soul and that purity. We cloud ourselves with an outer veneer and tend to get separated from our spiritual selves. Once a year, on anniversary of the creation of Adam, God gives us an opportunity to get back to ourselves, who we really are. The howling sound of the Shofar causes us to tremble, to shake us up a little bit and to bring us back to the state of the unblemished soul. Rosh Hashanah is a day of judgment and by sounding the shofar we are asking for that judgment, and what's that all about? Life is the ability to grow. We don't want to after an entire year, from this Rosh Hashanah to last Rosh Hashanah and say that we are still the same person. So we're saying next year, by this time I'd like to look back and say 'I'm a better person.' Rosh Hashanah begins this week and it marks the start of a ten day period known as the High Holy Days. We've been listening to a program from our archives. If you want to hear more, check out our podcast. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.