High Holy Days

07-Sep-21
Rabbi Eli Gewirtz
ROSH HASHANAH – Day of Atonement

Here’s a program from our archives.

music; ambience: Shofar

This week marks the beginning of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Commencing with the call of the Shofar, the ram’s horn, Rosh Hashanah is a time of atonement and reconciliation, a time to ask and give forgiveness for the transgressions of the past year and to start the new year afresh. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet.
Gewirtz: Rosh Hashanah, which literally means the ‘head of the year’ is the Jewish New Year and marks the anniversary of the creation of mankind, 5,759 years ago. It is the beginning of a ten day period known as the ten days of repentance which starts with Rosh Hashanah and culminates with the day of forgiveness, Yom Kippur.

Rabbi Eli Gewirtz is the National Director of Partners in Torah.

Gewirtz: We’re told that on the first day of Rosh Hashanah the fate of the completely righteous and, unfortunately, the completely wicked, are sealed. Their judgment is closed and not much is going to change during the coming nine days. The average people have their fate sealed somewhere in between and that’s why we have the ten days of repentance. What we try to do, during these ten days of atonement is to say: ‘OK what have I done in the past year on Sundays? What have I done wrong on Mondays? What have I done right?’ And we try to say, ‘OK, this is going to be the best Sunday of my life. This is going to be the best Monday of my life,’ and so on until we get to the Saturday, or the Shabboth, and ‘this is going to be the best Shabboth of my life. ‘ And with that newly acquired meaning for each day of the week, we are now prepared to enter Yom Kippur, and now God says ‘OK, we’re on the same team.’

We’ve been listening to a program from our archives. If you want to hear more, check out our podcast. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

High Holy Days

The week following Rosh Hashanah is when Jews repent for their transgressions of the previous year.
Air Date:09/07/2021
Scientist:Rabbi Eli Gewirtz
Transcript:

07-Sep-21 Rabbi Eli Gewirtz ROSH HASHANAH - Day of Atonement Here's a program from our archives. music; ambience: Shofar This week marks the beginning of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Commencing with the call of the Shofar, the ram's horn, Rosh Hashanah is a time of atonement and reconciliation, a time to ask and give forgiveness for the transgressions of the past year and to start the new year afresh. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Gewirtz: Rosh Hashanah, which literally means the 'head of the year' is the Jewish New Year and marks the anniversary of the creation of mankind, 5,759 years ago. It is the beginning of a ten day period known as the ten days of repentance which starts with Rosh Hashanah and culminates with the day of forgiveness, Yom Kippur. Rabbi Eli Gewirtz is the National Director of Partners in Torah. Gewirtz: We're told that on the first day of Rosh Hashanah the fate of the completely righteous and, unfortunately, the completely wicked, are sealed. Their judgment is closed and not much is going to change during the coming nine days. The average people have their fate sealed somewhere in between and that's why we have the ten days of repentance. What we try to do, during these ten days of atonement is to say: 'OK what have I done in the past year on Sundays? What have I done wrong on Mondays? What have I done right?' And we try to say, 'OK, this is going to be the best Sunday of my life. This is going to be the best Monday of my life,' and so on until we get to the Saturday, or the Shabboth, and 'this is going to be the best Shabboth of my life. ' And with that newly acquired meaning for each day of the week, we are now prepared to enter Yom Kippur, and now God says 'OK, we're on the same team.' We've been listening to a program from our archives. If you want to hear more, check out our podcast. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.