Coral Reefs – Endangered

Coral Reefs – Endangered In oceans around the world, coral reefs are endangered. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Trotz: Coral Reefs can be seen as indicators for the health of our environment. Maya Trotz is a professor of civil & environmental engineering at University of South Florida.Trotz: in the late 90’s and 2000s, we started to see a decline in coral reef health. The corals are bleached. There are hardly any live coral cover in many places, which was linked to the sea surface temperatures tending to be much higher than normal. But also impacts from development close to where the coral reefs are, sediment runoff, waste water pollution, over fishing – lots of other things that impact the reef system that have slowly decimated them. Coral reefs are made up of organisms called polyps which provide a home and protection for algae. Trotz: These increasingly warm years for the sea temperatures, impact the corals, because in changing the environment, the coral polyp – in response to the stresses, it ejects the algae that’s living in there that gives it its color. That gives it its life. If that bleaching event continues for too long, that algae doesn’t come back and the coral ends up going completely white and dying.In future programs, we’ll hear what scientists are doing to help restore coral reefs. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the Center for Earth and Environmental Nanotechnology and the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Coral Reefs - Endangered

What's causing reefs around the world to bleach and die?
Air Date:03/05/2021
Scientist:
Transcript:

Coral Reefs - Endangered In oceans around the world, coral reefs are endangered. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Trotz: Coral Reefs can be seen as indicators for the health of our environment. Maya Trotz is a professor of civil & environmental engineering at University of South Florida.Trotz: in the late 90's and 2000s, we started to see a decline in coral reef health. The corals are bleached. There are hardly any live coral cover in many places, which was linked to the sea surface temperatures tending to be much higher than normal. But also impacts from development close to where the coral reefs are, sediment runoff, waste water pollution, over fishing - lots of other things that impact the reef system that have slowly decimated them. Coral reefs are made up of organisms called polyps which provide a home and protection for algae. Trotz: These increasingly warm years for the sea temperatures, impact the corals, because in changing the environment, the coral polyp - in response to the stresses, it ejects the algae that's living in there that gives it its color. That gives it its life. If that bleaching event continues for too long, that algae doesn't come back and the coral ends up going completely white and dying.In future programs, we'll hear what scientists are doing to help restore coral reefs. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the Center for Earth and Environmental Nanotechnology and the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.