That Lump Could be a Turtle

Saving a TurtleAmbience: wind, waves, Beth Dixon: It can be a beautiful day and your can find a turtle, and it can be a horrible day with high winds, where you should find a turtle and might not find a turtle.When colder weather comes to Cape Cod, sea turtles start washing up on the shoreline, and volunteers like Beth Dixon scour the beaches to save them. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Beth Dixon: In the daytime you can scan the beach and you might see a lump, and if you’re familiar with the beach you’ll know that’s a turtle. If that’s the case, then I start running. Because specially with the big ones, you see a mound, and if you’re not familiar with the beach, you wouldn’t necessarily know it was a turtle from the distance. But the beach we walk we’ve walked for years now and we pretty much know when there are rocks and when there are not rocks. So one of us would take a photograph of it with the GPS coordinates. If it was right on the edge of the water and the wave might pull it back into the waves, we would drag it up as fast as you could, so the waves can’t reclaim it. Then get it on the sling, carry it out. Call it in, telling Audubon where we are on the beach. If they’ve got a person near one end or the other of the beach, we would walk it to wherever they can meet us.When a turtle is definitely alive, when you find it, that’s pretty exciting and hard to beat. I think that’s why we got hooked, finding that turtle that was still alive after being out on the beach with its head exposed for ten days. That got us pretty hooked. That you can make a difference in a creature’s life just by finding it and getting it some help, is a pretty small thing to but a very big thing in that animal’s life.With thanks to Beth and Paul Dixon, I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

That Lump Could be a Turtle

Get it on a sling, haul it out of the water, and call it in!
Air Date:03/02/2021
Scientist:
Transcript:

Saving a TurtleAmbience: wind, waves, Beth Dixon: It can be a beautiful day and your can find a turtle, and it can be a horrible day with high winds, where you should find a turtle and might not find a turtle.When colder weather comes to Cape Cod, sea turtles start washing up on the shoreline, and volunteers like Beth Dixon scour the beaches to save them. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Beth Dixon: In the daytime you can scan the beach and you might see a lump, and if you're familiar with the beach you'll know that's a turtle. If that's the case, then I start running. Because specially with the big ones, you see a mound, and if you're not familiar with the beach, you wouldn't necessarily know it was a turtle from the distance. But the beach we walk we've walked for years now and we pretty much know when there are rocks and when there are not rocks. So one of us would take a photograph of it with the GPS coordinates. If it was right on the edge of the water and the wave might pull it back into the waves, we would drag it up as fast as you could, so the waves can't reclaim it. Then get it on the sling, carry it out. Call it in, telling Audubon where we are on the beach. If they've got a person near one end or the other of the beach, we would walk it to wherever they can meet us.When a turtle is definitely alive, when you find it, that's pretty exciting and hard to beat. I think that's why we got hooked, finding that turtle that was still alive after being out on the beach with its head exposed for ten days. That got us pretty hooked. That you can make a difference in a creature's life just by finding it and getting it some help, is a pretty small thing to but a very big thing in that animal's life.With thanks to Beth and Paul Dixon, I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.