Rescuing Turtles on Cape Cod

Rescuing Turtles on Cape CodAmbience: wind, ocean wavesEvery year, with warming sea temperatures, sea turtles get lured further and further north on the eastern seaboard. On the journey home, some of those turtles get washed up on the beaches of Cape Cod. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Paul Dixon: The colder it gets, the lower their metabolism function becomes. Eventually they can’t feed themselves or swim. That’s when they start coming in in large numbers.Paul and Beth Dixon are among the roughly 200 volunteers who, every fall and winter, help rescue stranded turtles on Cape Cod. Beth Dixon: They beach because they are turtles that live in warm water. And so in the summer time they move north and might be feeding as far north as Maine. When the weather starts changing and the water gets colder, the turtles start migrating down. There are turtles that feed in the Cape Cod Bay all summer long, and then they’re joined by turtles that might be migrating down from further north, like Maine. And they get into the arm of the Cape, which is shaped like an arm with a hand sticking out. And when it’s getting cold, they’re moving south, but the arm of the Cape stops their migrations. So a smart turtle might move its way back up and out the Cape, and navigate its way into the Atlantic and go further South. A lot of turtles get stuck in the arm of the Cape and they can’t get out. And it’s cold and so they’re pretty stuckPaul Dixon: We make ourselves available when the weather turns and the water temp drops, and turtles start washing up on the beach. The rescue people at Mass Audubon will contact the volunteer walkers when they expect turtles to come. We walk on the high tide and see what the weather brings in.More about rescuing turtles in future programs. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Rescuing Turtles on Cape Cod

Migrating sea turtles get caught in the arm of the Cape.
Air Date:03/01/2021
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Transcript:

Rescuing Turtles on Cape CodAmbience: wind, ocean wavesEvery year, with warming sea temperatures, sea turtles get lured further and further north on the eastern seaboard. On the journey home, some of those turtles get washed up on the beaches of Cape Cod. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Paul Dixon: The colder it gets, the lower their metabolism function becomes. Eventually they can't feed themselves or swim. That's when they start coming in in large numbers.Paul and Beth Dixon are among the roughly 200 volunteers who, every fall and winter, help rescue stranded turtles on Cape Cod. Beth Dixon: They beach because they are turtles that live in warm water. And so in the summer time they move north and might be feeding as far north as Maine. When the weather starts changing and the water gets colder, the turtles start migrating down. There are turtles that feed in the Cape Cod Bay all summer long, and then they're joined by turtles that might be migrating down from further north, like Maine. And they get into the arm of the Cape, which is shaped like an arm with a hand sticking out. And when it's getting cold, they're moving south, but the arm of the Cape stops their migrations. So a smart turtle might move its way back up and out the Cape, and navigate its way into the Atlantic and go further South. A lot of turtles get stuck in the arm of the Cape and they can't get out. And it's cold and so they're pretty stuckPaul Dixon: We make ourselves available when the weather turns and the water temp drops, and turtles start washing up on the beach. The rescue people at Mass Audubon will contact the volunteer walkers when they expect turtles to come. We walk on the high tide and see what the weather brings in.More about rescuing turtles in future programs. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.