Mow High With a Sharp Blade

If youre a serious golfer youve probably come to appreciate the turf grass you play on. There are lessons learned from golf course greens that can improve a home lawn. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience: golf swingSoldat: A lot of the things that we learn when we’re studying golf courses we then will take to homeowners and the general public to talk to them about improving their lawn management, based on the things that we’ve learned in golf. Doug Soldat is a professor in the department of soil science at the University of Wisconsin.Soldat: The shorter you mow the grass, the more inputs you’re going to need to keep it alive. We see that example with golf course putting greens where they’re mowed sometimes to less than an eighth of an inch. That means that when you have a grass that short, the root system is shallower. Which means you’ll have to apply irrigation, otherwise the roots can’t access the water deeper down in the soil profile, that a taller grass would have access to. Golf course putting greens have the clippings removed from them. Clippings are a main source of plant nutrition, part of the recycling process. When we take them off the green, we have to add fertilizers to replace them. For home lawns, its possible to avoid using fertilizers by leave your clippings on the lawn.Soldat: The best advise I can give to someone is mow high with a sharp blade. Mow your grass as high as you can tolerate it and use a sharp mower blade. Even though grasses are adapted to frequent mowing, they much prefer to be cut with a sharp blade than a dull blade. Leave your clippings on the lawn. Don’t bag your clippings. Those clippings are an important source of nutrition to the grass. Utilize them.I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. If you want hear more, check out our podcast.

Mow High With a Sharp Blade

Lessons learned from golf course greens can improve a home lawn.
Air Date:09/23/2020
Scientist:
Transcript:

If youre a serious golfer youve probably come to appreciate the turf grass you play on. There are lessons learned from golf course greens that can improve a home lawn. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience: golf swingSoldat: A lot of the things that we learn when we're studying golf courses we then will take to homeowners and the general public to talk to them about improving their lawn management, based on the things that we've learned in golf. Doug Soldat is a professor in the department of soil science at the University of Wisconsin.Soldat: The shorter you mow the grass, the more inputs you're going to need to keep it alive. We see that example with golf course putting greens where they're mowed sometimes to less than an eighth of an inch. That means that when you have a grass that short, the root system is shallower. Which means you'll have to apply irrigation, otherwise the roots can't access the water deeper down in the soil profile, that a taller grass would have access to. Golf course putting greens have the clippings removed from them. Clippings are a main source of plant nutrition, part of the recycling process. When we take them off the green, we have to add fertilizers to replace them. For home lawns, its possible to avoid using fertilizers by leave your clippings on the lawn.Soldat: The best advise I can give to someone is mow high with a sharp blade. Mow your grass as high as you can tolerate it and use a sharp mower blade. Even though grasses are adapted to frequent mowing, they much prefer to be cut with a sharp blade than a dull blade. Leave your clippings on the lawn. Don't bag your clippings. Those clippings are an important source of nutrition to the grass. Utilize them.I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. If you want hear more, check out our podcast.