Chimpanzees – Tools

Chimpanzees Tools

ambience: Chimps, Budongo rainforest
Hobaiter: Chimps definitely use tools. It’s actually one of the things that really led us to be particularly fascinated by their behavior.

In Africa, scientists have been closely observing chimpanzee behavior, especially their use of tools. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Hobaiter: For years, we used to think that humans were the only tool users. We were Man, the tool user, and that made us special.

Catherine Hobaiter is a lecturer in Evolutionary Psychology at St. Andrews University in Scotland. She travels to Uganda’s Budongo Rainforest every year to study chimps.

Hobaiter:.. Jane Goodall was the first person to go out and really observe chimps in their natural habitat and very quickly saw that they not only use tools, but they make their own tools, really regularly for all sorts of different behaviors. And we now know that lots of other animals do use tools. But chimps are something special when it comes to the range of tools and the way in which they make them.
The chimp behavior varies massively from group to group within an area and from area to area, across Africa.
They’ll eat termites and ants and they do use tools for those. They’ll make these long wands from sticks and dip them into termite mounds or into ant trails. The ants and termites will grab onto the stick and they’ll sweep them off quickly into their mouth so that they can actually eat them without getting bitten.
Or they take leaves and they chew them into sponges that they can use to soak up water and drink with. Chimpanzees in West Africa actually use stone tools. There they make a hammer and an anvil and crack open nuts using the two together.

We’ll hear more on chimpanzees in future programs. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.

Chimpanzees - Tools

Chimps make their own tools for all sorts of different needs and behaviors.
Air Date:02/02/2015
Scientist:
Transcript:

Chimpanzees Tools

ambience: Chimps, Budongo rainforest
Hobaiter: Chimps definitely use tools. It's actually one of the things that really led us to be particularly fascinated by their behavior.

In Africa, scientists have been closely observing chimpanzee behavior, especially their use of tools. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Hobaiter: For years, we used to think that humans were the only tool users. We were Man, the tool user, and that made us special.

Catherine Hobaiter is a lecturer in Evolutionary Psychology at St. Andrews University in Scotland. She travels to Uganda's Budongo Rainforest every year to study chimps.

Hobaiter:.. Jane Goodall was the first person to go out and really observe chimps in their natural habitat and very quickly saw that they not only use tools, but they make their own tools, really regularly for all sorts of different behaviors. And we now know that lots of other animals do use tools. But chimps are something special when it comes to the range of tools and the way in which they make them.
The chimp behavior varies massively from group to group within an area and from area to area, across Africa.
They'll eat termites and ants and they do use tools for those. They'll make these long wands from sticks and dip them into termite mounds or into ant trails. The ants and termites will grab onto the stick and they'll sweep them off quickly into their mouth so that they can actually eat them without getting bitten.
Or they take leaves and they chew them into sponges that they can use to soak up water and drink with. Chimpanzees in West Africa actually use stone tools. There they make a hammer and an anvil and crack open nuts using the two together.

We'll hear more on chimpanzees in future programs. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.