Earthquake Prediction

Earthquake Prediction and Preparation

Ambience: Time lapse earthquake recording

Although we can’t pinpoint precisely when and where an earthquake will occur, we can still be prepared for when they do occur. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. We’re listening to a time lapse recording of an earthquake.

Glasscoe: We’ll be able to better know the likelihood of when an event will happen in a time period and an area in a percent chance, sort of like the weather. But we’ll never be able to hone in on any exact time or place. There’s too many variables to predict.

Maggi Glasscoe is a geoscientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Glasscoe: Since we can’t predict when an earthquake happens, the best thing we can do is to be ready in the event that an earthquake occurs because its not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. So have your earthquake kit ready. Have your earthquake plan ready.
If you should be caught in an earthquake, you should look for a safe place to take cover – under a desk and any place where you won’t be hit by something that’s going to shake off the wall or fall over. Basically you want to look around and make sure there’s no falling objects, looking for a table or desk to hide under, that sort of thing.

While scientists know that earthquakes are very destructive and can cause a lot of damage, we’re working to understand them better so that we can hope to reduce the losses. So it’s kind of a double edged sword for us. We understand that there’s a lot destruction and it affects lives, but we’re also working to reduce the effect of those earthquakes. So its important research because of that.

Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation and by Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.

Earthquake Prediction

Although we can't pinpoint precisely when and where earthquakes will occur, we can still be prepared for them.
Air Date:07/25/2016
Scientist:
Transcript:

Earthquake Prediction and Preparation

Ambience: Time lapse earthquake recording

Although we can't pinpoint precisely when and where an earthquake will occur, we can still be prepared for when they do occur. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. We're listening to a time lapse recording of an earthquake.

Glasscoe: We'll be able to better know the likelihood of when an event will happen in a time period and an area in a percent chance, sort of like the weather. But we'll never be able to hone in on any exact time or place. There's too many variables to predict.

Maggi Glasscoe is a geoscientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Glasscoe: Since we can't predict when an earthquake happens, the best thing we can do is to be ready in the event that an earthquake occurs because its not a matter of if, it's a matter of when. So have your earthquake kit ready. Have your earthquake plan ready.
If you should be caught in an earthquake, you should look for a safe place to take cover - under a desk and any place where you won't be hit by something that's going to shake off the wall or fall over. Basically you want to look around and make sure there's no falling objects, looking for a table or desk to hide under, that sort of thing.

While scientists know that earthquakes are very destructive and can cause a lot of damage, we're working to understand them better so that we can hope to reduce the losses. So it's kind of a double edged sword for us. We understand that there's a lot destruction and it affects lives, but we're also working to reduce the effect of those earthquakes. So its important research because of that.

Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation and by Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.