Earthquake Respone

Earthquake Response
ambience: timelapse earthquake recording

We’re listening to a time lapse recording of an earthquake. When a large quake occurs, city planners and disaster teams need information fast about where and how best – to respond. I’m Jim Metzner and this the Pulse of the Planet.

Glasscoe: We use remote sensing data including observations from satellites to observe the earth to help disaster response.

Maggi Glasscoe is a geophysicist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She’s part of an earthquake response team called E – Decider.

Glasscoe: We use GPS observations to see how the earth’s surface moves. This helps to generate the maps that we create that help decision makers in the event of a disaster. We also use information from the United States Geological Survey to trigger simulations that create these maps. And we use the observational data which shows what actually happens to help to refine these models. These maps are created to help the decision makers see where the damage might have occurred from these earthquakes. And they help them to make the decisions to allocate their resources in the event of an earthquake.

So we create tilt maps that show vertical change. This shows where pipelines might be broken or you might have buildings being damaged because you’ve had a change in slope. This is a map that shows where vertical change like tilt might have affected the ground.

Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation and Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.

Earthquake Respone

When a large earthquake occurs, city planners and disaster teams need information fast about where and how best to respond.
Air Date:07/20/2016
Scientist:
Transcript:

Earthquake Response
ambience: timelapse earthquake recording

We're listening to a time lapse recording of an earthquake. When a large quake occurs, city planners and disaster teams need information fast about where and how best - to respond. I'm Jim Metzner and this the Pulse of the Planet.

Glasscoe: We use remote sensing data including observations from satellites to observe the earth to help disaster response.

Maggi Glasscoe is a geophysicist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She's part of an earthquake response team called E - Decider.

Glasscoe: We use GPS observations to see how the earth's surface moves. This helps to generate the maps that we create that help decision makers in the event of a disaster. We also use information from the United States Geological Survey to trigger simulations that create these maps. And we use the observational data which shows what actually happens to help to refine these models. These maps are created to help the decision makers see where the damage might have occurred from these earthquakes. And they help them to make the decisions to allocate their resources in the event of an earthquake.

So we create tilt maps that show vertical change. This shows where pipelines might be broken or you might have buildings being damaged because you've had a change in slope. This is a map that shows where vertical change like tilt might have affected the ground.

Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation and Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.