Prevention Through Design – New Ideas

Prevention Through Design New Ideas, Anyone?

How many times have you bought a tool or an appliance, tried it out and said, “Boy, if only they had done this or changed that, it would have been so much better or safer?” Well, here’s your chance to do something about it; stay tuned. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Deborah Young-Corbett is with the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science at Virginia Tech. She specializes in a field called Prevention Through Design.

Young-Corbett: To practice coming up with design ideas, a person might get a common household item, say a hand tool a hammer or an electric drill, and do what is called an artifact analysis. You describe the item in as much detail as you can. What materials is it made of? What sort of capabilities does it have? How much does it weigh? What color is it? After describing it, you can brainstorm about what features you like about that artifact and what features you don’t like about the artifact and once you’ve identified the features that you don’t like, you can identify how you might foresee changing those features, so that it could be a better product. And people do this all the time. We’re all designers by nature; we’re always thinking of designs and redesigns and improvements.

So now it’s your turn.

Young-Corbett: I would like to challenge any listeners who would like to try their hand at redesigning some common household item to maybe find either a hand tool or a kitchen tool and describe the features of that tool that you don’t like and how you might suggest redesigning. There are always opportunities to redesign and improve even the simplest tools.

If you’d like to take up this challenge, visit our website pulseplanet.com, click on the Facebook icon and tell us your idea. If it’s selected, you’ll get one of our Pulse of the Planet CD’s and you may hear your idea featured on a future program. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation; I’m Jim Metzner.

Prevention Through Design - New Ideas

Try your hand at resigning a tool or household appliance.
Air Date:05/20/2016
Scientist:
Transcript:

Prevention Through Design New Ideas, Anyone?

How many times have you bought a tool or an appliance, tried it out and said, "Boy, if only they had done this or changed that, it would have been so much better or safer?" Well, here's your chance to do something about it; stay tuned. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Deborah Young-Corbett is with the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science at Virginia Tech. She specializes in a field called Prevention Through Design.

Young-Corbett: To practice coming up with design ideas, a person might get a common household item, say a hand tool a hammer or an electric drill, and do what is called an artifact analysis. You describe the item in as much detail as you can. What materials is it made of? What sort of capabilities does it have? How much does it weigh? What color is it? After describing it, you can brainstorm about what features you like about that artifact and what features you don't like about the artifact and once you've identified the features that you don't like, you can identify how you might foresee changing those features, so that it could be a better product. And people do this all the time. We're all designers by nature; we're always thinking of designs and redesigns and improvements.

So now it's your turn.

Young-Corbett: I would like to challenge any listeners who would like to try their hand at redesigning some common household item to maybe find either a hand tool or a kitchen tool and describe the features of that tool that you don't like and how you might suggest redesigning. There are always opportunities to redesign and improve even the simplest tools.

If you'd like to take up this challenge, visit our website pulseplanet.com, click on the Facebook icon and tell us your idea. If it's selected, you'll get one of our Pulse of the Planet CD's and you may hear your idea featured on a future program. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation; I'm Jim Metzner.