Food Science – Objectivity

Food Science – Objectivity

Food scientists try to look at food objectively. They might for example, be preparing a report for a company that’s trying to come up with a new flavor for a product. But can you really be objective about food? I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Susan Duncan is a Professor of Food Science and Technology at Virginia Tech. We had lunch together recently and I asked her, as an experiment, to speak about a favorite food both as an ordinary mortal and then as a food scientist.

Duncan: And I’m smelling cinnamon and nutmeg and that vanilla flavoring associated with the icing, and I am anticipating. My mouth starts really watering at this point, and I as I take that first bite, it all blends together the crust as it crunches against my teeth, the melt of those sugar granules, the combination of cinnamon and apple and nutmeg and that aromatic nature of that piece of piece is totally satisfying.

So, what is an apple pie, from a food scientist’s perspective? We are searching for that cinnamon that doesn’t have a huge amount of burn to it. I It has to have a flavor that’s going to survive a high-heat process, an aroma that’s gonna continue over the freezing operation, and then the baking, and still have that “note” when I taste the product.
So I need an apple that’s going to have a lot of firmness to it, but yet, when it gets cooked, I’m going to need the moisture to not be so excessive that I get a runny apple pie. I need it to thicken up properly. I don’t want it to be as thin as as ketchup. I want it to be thicker than that.

We’d like to hear about your favorite foods. Visit us on Facebook and if we choose your description you may end up hearing it on the air and receive one of our PoP CD’s. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Food Science - Objectivity

Try objectifying pie without getting hungry!
Air Date:05/19/2016
Scientist:
Transcript:

Food Science - Objectivity

Food scientists try to look at food objectively. They might for example, be preparing a report for a company that's trying to come up with a new flavor for a product. But can you really be objective about food? I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Susan Duncan is a Professor of Food Science and Technology at Virginia Tech. We had lunch together recently and I asked her, as an experiment, to speak about a favorite food both as an ordinary mortal and then as a food scientist.

Duncan: And I'm smelling cinnamon and nutmeg and that vanilla flavoring associated with the icing, and I am anticipating. My mouth starts really watering at this point, and I as I take that first bite, it all blends together the crust as it crunches against my teeth, the melt of those sugar granules, the combination of cinnamon and apple and nutmeg and that aromatic nature of that piece of piece is totally satisfying.

So, what is an apple pie, from a food scientist's perspective? We are searching for that cinnamon that doesn't have a huge amount of burn to it. I It has to have a flavor that's going to survive a high-heat process, an aroma that's gonna continue over the freezing operation, and then the baking, and still have that "note" when I taste the product.
So I need an apple that's going to have a lot of firmness to it, but yet, when it gets cooked, I'm going to need the moisture to not be so excessive that I get a runny apple pie. I need it to thicken up properly. I don't want it to be as thin as as ketchup. I want it to be thicker than that.

We'd like to hear about your favorite foods. Visit us on Facebook and if we choose your description you may end up hearing it on the air and receive one of our PoP CD's. Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.