Food Science – Language of Food

Science of Food – Language of Food

Duncan: The lubricity of the sensation of flavor and smoothness and that richness and satisfying perception that comes from

Listening to a food scientist talk about taste is a bit like hearing a wine connoisseur describing a favorite vintage. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Duncan: Lubricity can be defined as that sensation of something rolling across your tongue.

Susan Duncan is a Professor of Food Science and Technology. We recently had lunch at a school cafeteria and talked about how the language of food.

Duncan: There are a lot of different ways to characterize food, and part of the role of sensory evaluation, in some ways, is to provide qualitative verbal word lexicons or quantitative amounts how much something is in a food.
Food is very complex, and among those things are the type of chemicals that are aromatic. That means that they are in gas phase, or they’re volatile, and they can reach our nose and go into the back of our throat or through our mouth and up into our nose, and the combination of those creates the aroma characteristic. A “note” could be a set of those chemicals that’s not at the right magnitude or combination, and so, it might be an off note, an off character. Alternatively, the balance of notes means that I really can’t distinguish certain characteristics so much. It’s all so well-blended that I perceive it as being this totally rich and perfect combination of things.
A flavor chemist from a flavor house would be so well trained that they would typically be able to find those individual characteristics, but when they find a combination that they can’t discern, I’m sure that they’re thinking, “That is perfection.”

Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.

Food Science - Language of Food

Listening to a food scientist talk about taste is a bit like hearing a wine connoisseur describing a favorite vintage.
Air Date:01/20/2014
Scientist:
Transcript:

Science of Food - Language of Food

Duncan: The lubricity of the sensation of flavor and smoothness and that richness and satisfying perception that comes from

Listening to a food scientist talk about taste is a bit like hearing a wine connoisseur describing a favorite vintage. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Duncan: Lubricity can be defined as that sensation of something rolling across your tongue.

Susan Duncan is a Professor of Food Science and Technology. We recently had lunch at a school cafeteria and talked about how the language of food.

Duncan: There are a lot of different ways to characterize food, and part of the role of sensory evaluation, in some ways, is to provide qualitative verbal word lexicons or quantitative amounts how much something is in a food.
Food is very complex, and among those things are the type of chemicals that are aromatic. That means that they are in gas phase, or they're volatile, and they can reach our nose and go into the back of our throat or through our mouth and up into our nose, and the combination of those creates the aroma characteristic. A "note" could be a set of those chemicals that's not at the right magnitude or combination, and so, it might be an off note, an off character. Alternatively, the balance of notes means that I really can't distinguish certain characteristics so much. It's all so well-blended that I perceive it as being this totally rich and perfect combination of things.
A flavor chemist from a flavor house would be so well trained that they would typically be able to find those individual characteristics, but when they find a combination that they can't discern, I'm sure that they're thinking, "That is perfection."

Pulse of the Planet is made possible in part by Virginia Tech, inventing the future through a hands-on approach to education and research.