Splitting Water

Sustainable Chemistry Splitting WaterMusic, Ambience Bubbling waterJM: Water “H20”, which means that a molecule of water contains both Hydrogen and Oxygen. What if you could affordably split a molecule of water into its component gases? I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.SB: One of the key challenges we’re working in is to develop materials that can be used to make fuel. JM: Shannon Boettcher (Bet-cher) is an assistant professor of chemistry at University of Oregon in EugeneSB: Imagine you could use water as a material, shine light on another material and take the protons off water and combine them to make hydrogen, H2 gas, and take the oxygens and combine them to make 02, oxygen gas. If you collect the hydrogen gas that’s a fuel that can be burned later or used in a fuel cell to make electricity. That’s a way to store energy. So one of the things we’re doing also in the center is trying to make materials that facilitate that process of splitting the water molecule.SB: So this is an experiment where we shine light on materials we’ve made and we try to understand how that light energy gets converted into energy that can be used to rip apart the bonds in water, for instance to make hydrogen gas and oxygen gas from water which is a way to store energy. JM: If a way can be found to generate Hydrogen gas affordably, it could be used as a fuel to heat homes, run cars and all the other things we currently use fossil fuels for and we’d have an unlimited supply. Our thanks to the Center for Sustainable Materials Chemistry. Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Splitting Water

In the process of developing alternative fuel souces, you may have to split a few molecules along the way.
Air Date:09/22/2020
Scientist:
Transcript:

Sustainable Chemistry Splitting WaterMusic, Ambience Bubbling waterJM: Water "H20", which means that a molecule of water contains both Hydrogen and Oxygen. What if you could affordably split a molecule of water into its component gases? I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.SB: One of the key challenges we're working in is to develop materials that can be used to make fuel. JM: Shannon Boettcher (Bet-cher) is an assistant professor of chemistry at University of Oregon in EugeneSB: Imagine you could use water as a material, shine light on another material and take the protons off water and combine them to make hydrogen, H2 gas, and take the oxygens and combine them to make 02, oxygen gas. If you collect the hydrogen gas that's a fuel that can be burned later or used in a fuel cell to make electricity. That's a way to store energy. So one of the things we're doing also in the center is trying to make materials that facilitate that process of splitting the water molecule.SB: So this is an experiment where we shine light on materials we've made and we try to understand how that light energy gets converted into energy that can be used to rip apart the bonds in water, for instance to make hydrogen gas and oxygen gas from water which is a way to store energy. JM: If a way can be found to generate Hydrogen gas affordably, it could be used as a fuel to heat homes, run cars and all the other things we currently use fossil fuels for and we'd have an unlimited supply. Our thanks to the Center for Sustainable Materials Chemistry. Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.