Science Diary: Mims – Observatory

Science Diary: Mims Observatory

music; ambience: water runoff

“Well, I came up today to do some ozone calibrations. I build and test instruments that measure the ozone layer, and I’ve been doing that for 17 years. And there was quite a major thunderstorm when I got here today. And not only did it rain a lot, but it left a lot of hail. So the place is white. It’s quite striking. It’s just beautiful.”

ambience: water runoff

Citizen scientist Forrest Mims is at Hawaii’s Mauna Loa observatory, one of the world’s most important meteorological research stations, where scientists measure the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Welcome to Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries, a glimpse of the world of science from the inside.

“Now I’m about to walk into the Keeling building, which is the original building. This was built in 1956. This is where the buildup of the earth’s carbon dioxide was first discovered back in the late 50s. The instrument is still here, but it no longer works. It’s been replaced by a newer instrument. I’m standing in front of instruments that measure the ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particles in the atmosphere. We have almost a 50 year record of measuring these gasses and particles in the atmosphere.”

Forrest Mims visits Mauna Loa annually to calibrate instruments he’s developed, which measure a variety of atmospheric data.

“Mauna Loa Observatory has a special rooftop deck, where they have placed specialized instruments that measure sunlight, including instruments that measure the ozone layer. And that’s my specialty, so I’ve often made measurements here. There’s two Canadian instruments that do that. And then there’s a New Zealand instrument that measures ultraviolet. There are instruments that measure photosynthetic radiation and ultraviolet for the department of agriculture, and a host of other very significant instruments.”

Check out Forrest Mims’ blog on pulseplanet.com.

Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries are made possible by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Science Diary: Mims - Observatory

Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory has long been a favorite research station for meteorological and atmospheric scientists worldwide.
Air Date:05/26/2008
Scientist:
Transcript:


Science Diary: Mims Observatory

music; ambience: water runoff

“Well, I came up today to do some ozone calibrations. I build and test instruments that measure the ozone layer, and I’ve been doing that for 17 years. And there was quite a major thunderstorm when I got here today. And not only did it rain a lot, but it left a lot of hail. So the place is white. It’s quite striking. It’s just beautiful.”

ambience: water runoff

Citizen scientist Forrest Mims is at Hawaii’s Mauna Loa observatory, one of the world’s most important meteorological research stations, where scientists measure the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Welcome to Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries, a glimpse of the world of science from the inside.

“Now I’m about to walk into the Keeling building, which is the original building. This was built in 1956. This is where the buildup of the earth’s carbon dioxide was first discovered back in the late 50s. The instrument is still here, but it no longer works. It’s been replaced by a newer instrument. I’m standing in front of instruments that measure the ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particles in the atmosphere. We have almost a 50 year record of measuring these gasses and particles in the atmosphere.”

Forrest Mims visits Mauna Loa annually to calibrate instruments he’s developed, which measure a variety of atmospheric data.

“Mauna Loa Observatory has a special rooftop deck, where they have placed specialized instruments that measure sunlight, including instruments that measure the ozone layer. And that’s my specialty, so I’ve often made measurements here. There’s two Canadian instruments that do that. And then there’s a New Zealand instrument that measures ultraviolet. There are instruments that measure photosynthetic radiation and ultraviolet for the department of agriculture, and a host of other very significant instruments.”

Check out Forrest Mims’ blog on pulseplanet.com.

Pulse of the Planet’s Science Diaries are made possible by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.