Pantanal – Birds

music
ambience: dawn chorus Corridor Sao Sebastian Fazenda, Rio Negro, Pantanal Brazil

One of the largest wetlands areas on Earth is Brazil’s Pantanal, located south of the Amazon and East of the Andes. The Pantanal is one of the few places in the world where it’s still possible to study a diversity of life that’s relatively untouched by man. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Ornithologist Reggie Donatelli works with teams of Earthwatch volunteers to study and survey the hundreds of species birds in the Pantanal.

“The volunteers help me with setting up the mists nests which is a complicated thing to do.”

The first step in trying to capture a bird in a mist net, is to record its song, and then play it back near the net, hoping to lure the bird into the nets fine mesh. Here’s the call of an ant Wren we were trying to summon.

ambience: ant Wren call

Once the bird is captured, its measurements are taken and then it’s banded and released. The information becomes part of Professor Donatelli’s database, used to better understand the diversity of life in the Pantanal.

“The leg is two point twenty-two. And the tail now — this is a good reflex –five point two. Now we’re going to see if the bird has any mote. Ah, it has an incubation plate. Look no feathers in the belly, means this female is incubating eggs. Look, see how red it is. Now I put in a bag. I know this bag weighs 32 grams. And I like to see the weight of the bird. Now we release the bird on the ground.”

Pulse of the Planet is presented with support provided by the National Science Foundation . I’m Jim Metzner.

music

Pantanal - Birds

Working in Brazil's Panatanal, the largest wetlands in the world, researchers study the tremendous variety of local birds by capturing them in mist nets, banding and releasing them.
Air Date:11/29/2002
Scientist:
Transcript:


music
ambience: dawn chorus Corridor Sao Sebastian Fazenda, Rio Negro, Pantanal Brazil

One of the largest wetlands areas on Earth is Brazil's Pantanal, located south of the Amazon and East of the Andes. The Pantanal is one of the few places in the world where it's still possible to study a diversity of life that's relatively untouched by man. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Ornithologist Reggie Donatelli works with teams of Earthwatch volunteers to study and survey the hundreds of species birds in the Pantanal.

"The volunteers help me with setting up the mists nests which is a complicated thing to do."

The first step in trying to capture a bird in a mist net, is to record its song, and then play it back near the net, hoping to lure the bird into the nets fine mesh. Here's the call of an ant Wren we were trying to summon.

ambience: ant Wren call

Once the bird is captured, its measurements are taken and then it's banded and released. The information becomes part of Professor Donatelli's database, used to better understand the diversity of life in the Pantanal.

"The leg is two point twenty-two. And the tail now -- this is a good reflex --five point two. Now we're going to see if the bird has any mote. Ah, it has an incubation plate. Look no feathers in the belly, means this female is incubating eggs. Look, see how red it is. Now I put in a bag. I know this bag weighs 32 grams. And I like to see the weight of the bird. Now we release the bird on the ground."

Pulse of the Planet is presented with support provided by the National Science Foundation . I'm Jim Metzner.

music