Owl Feathers – Barred

Owl Feathers – Barred

Music; Ambience: Barred owls

JM: We’re listening to the sounds of a Barred Owl. Over the past forty years these nocturnal predators have rapidly spread throughout the Western United States. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Historically, Barred owls have occupied the forest east of the Rocky Mountains. However, since the 1960’s, they’ve been moving across the Rockies into the forests of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and now California. Kim Middleton is a raptor biologist with the Peregrine Fund in Boise, Idaho.

KM: “They have a large variety of sounds that they do make, although most of those sounds are going to be attributed to establishing their territory and communication between mates. So, owls in captivity, at least wild owls, do not usually vocalize unless they are under stress.

JM: The Barred owls name come from its plumage.

KM:”Barred owls are called barred owls because they have a scallop pattern, which you see on the upper breast and the head and neck. It is a close cousin to the spotted owl, which would then have spotted pattern instead of this scalloped barred pattern. This bird is kind of creamy white to grayish brown, and it blends perfectly with the bark of deciduous trees. If this bird was sitting on a branch next to the bark of a cottonwood, you probably would have a hard time finding it. The pattern of the feathers is very cryptic, which means that they can blend in with their environment very easily.”

JM: Pulse of the Planet is presented with support provided by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Owl Feathers - Barred

These stealthy predators are named after the pattern on their feathers, which offers them near-perfect camouflage.
Air Date:12/17/2013
Scientist:
Transcript:

Owl Feathers - Barred

Music; Ambience: Barred owls

JM: We're listening to the sounds of a Barred Owl. Over the past forty years these nocturnal predators have rapidly spread throughout the Western United States. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Historically, Barred owls have occupied the forest east of the Rocky Mountains. However, since the 1960's, they've been moving across the Rockies into the forests of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and now California. Kim Middleton is a raptor biologist with the Peregrine Fund in Boise, Idaho.

KM: "They have a large variety of sounds that they do make, although most of those sounds are going to be attributed to establishing their territory and communication between mates. So, owls in captivity, at least wild owls, do not usually vocalize unless they are under stress.

JM: The Barred owls name come from its plumage.

KM:"Barred owls are called barred owls because they have a scallop pattern, which you see on the upper breast and the head and neck. It is a close cousin to the spotted owl, which would then have spotted pattern instead of this scalloped barred pattern. This bird is kind of creamy white to grayish brown, and it blends perfectly with the bark of deciduous trees. If this bird was sitting on a branch next to the bark of a cottonwood, you probably would have a hard time finding it. The pattern of the feathers is very cryptic, which means that they can blend in with their environment very easily."

JM: Pulse of the Planet is presented with support provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.