Kaqchikel: Wedding

Kaqchikel: Wedding

Music
Ambience: Wedding procession

Weddings may be universally important. But they’re far from universal in the way they’re celebrated. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. We’re listening to an indigenous Guatemalan Wedding Procession. A villager, a member of the local Kaqchikel culture, is explaining their marriage tradition.

“The wedding preparations begin in the morning. First the parents of the groom and the groom get dressed. Then they go to the house of the godparents who the couple has selected to represent them. Then the groom, his parents, and the godparents all go together to the house of the bride. Meanwhile at the house of the bride, her parents and friends get her clothes and veil ready. In the house of the bride, there are musicians who come to play music so the guests and neighbors will be entertained while they wait for the bride and her parents to finish getting ready. Then all the people are gathered at the bride’s home. From there the couple, their parents, the godparents, other family, friends and neighbors leave for the church, and the musicians follow them and play in the procession. The musicians play all the way until they reach the church where they will have a mass for the wedding. Godparents are always an older couple that has been married through the Catholic Church, because it is important that they know what marriage is like so they can explain to the young couple what lies ahead of them. The family, neighbors, friends and godparents participate in the procession so it is quite large. When the people of the town hear the music they know that the boy and the girl will be married in the church.”

Please visit us on the news page of nationalgeographic.com

Pulse of the Planet is presented with support provided by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

Kaqchikel: Wedding

In Kaqchikel tradition, a wedding is a progressive event - starting at the home of the groom.
Air Date:07/25/2007
Scientist:
Transcript:

Kaqchikel: Wedding

Music
Ambience: Wedding procession

Weddings may be universally important. But they're far from universal in the way they're celebrated. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. We're listening to an indigenous Guatemalan Wedding Procession. A villager, a member of the local Kaqchikel culture, is explaining their marriage tradition.

"The wedding preparations begin in the morning. First the parents of the groom and the groom get dressed. Then they go to the house of the godparents who the couple has selected to represent them. Then the groom, his parents, and the godparents all go together to the house of the bride. Meanwhile at the house of the bride, her parents and friends get her clothes and veil ready. In the house of the bride, there are musicians who come to play music so the guests and neighbors will be entertained while they wait for the bride and her parents to finish getting ready. Then all the people are gathered at the bride's home. From there the couple, their parents, the godparents, other family, friends and neighbors leave for the church, and the musicians follow them and play in the procession. The musicians play all the way until they reach the church where they will have a mass for the wedding. Godparents are always an older couple that has been married through the Catholic Church, because it is important that they know what marriage is like so they can explain to the young couple what lies ahead of them. The family, neighbors, friends and godparents participate in the procession so it is quite large. When the people of the town hear the music they know that the boy and the girl will be married in the church."

Please visit us on the news page of nationalgeographic.com

Pulse of the Planet is presented with support provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.