Yoiks – Carrying On The Tradition

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For hundreds of years nomadic Sami herdsman of Scandinavia have preserved the history of their people with a unique form of story-song called a “Yoik.” Today, a handful of young Sami musicians are trying to keep that tradition alive. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Although Yoiking was once forbidden by the Christian church across much of Scandinavia, many traditional yoiks have survived. Annukka Hirvasvoupio is a popular musician from Tampere, Finland.

“Young Samis are learning yoiks maybe from the elders– grandfathers, grandmothers. Myself, I remember some yoiks from my childhood but not so many. All the time I’m training to learn the right way to use my voice when I am yoiking. And I hope that someday I could say that I am a yoiker too.”

Annukka and her group Villdas combine Yoik singing with eclectic instruments and sophisticated recording techniques, but Annukka is also committed to continuing the tradition of yoik.

“The yoik has survived so many years, even if it has been forbidden. I don’t want to be the one who stops yoiking. I want to carry on that tradition. And it’s very important also to teach my grandchildren how to yoik.”

To hear about our new CD, please pulseplanet.com. Pulse of the Planet is presented by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

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Yoiks - Carrying On The Tradition

The nomadic Sami herdsmen of Scandinavia have preserved their oral history in a unique form of story-song called a "yoik."
Air Date:11/11/2009
Scientist:
Transcript:

music
ambience

For hundreds of years nomadic Sami herdsman of Scandinavia have preserved the history of their people with a unique form of story-song called a "Yoik." Today, a handful of young Sami musicians are trying to keep that tradition alive. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Although Yoiking was once forbidden by the Christian church across much of Scandinavia, many traditional yoiks have survived. Annukka Hirvasvoupio is a popular musician from Tampere, Finland.

"Young Samis are learning yoiks maybe from the elders-- grandfathers, grandmothers. Myself, I remember some yoiks from my childhood but not so many. All the time I'm training to learn the right way to use my voice when I am yoiking. And I hope that someday I could say that I am a yoiker too."

Annukka and her group Villdas combine Yoik singing with eclectic instruments and sophisticated recording techniques, but Annukka is also committed to continuing the tradition of yoik.

"The yoik has survived so many years, even if it has been forbidden. I don't want to be the one who stops yoiking. I want to carry on that tradition. And it's very important also to teach my grandchildren how to yoik."

To hear about our new CD, please pulseplanet.com. Pulse of the Planet is presented by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.

music