Hurricane Service

music
ambience: sermon choir

Well, the hurricane season looms, and those living in the east coast are readying for potential turbulent weather. They’re also getting some guidance from their local houses of worship. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Hurricanes are high intensity tropical cyclones that form each year in the Atlantic and elsewhere around the world. Churches up and down the eastern seaboard come together to pray for a quiet season, and to emphasize the need for communities to pull together in times of disaster. In years past, Reverend Robert Murphy held such services at the Unitarian Universalistic Church in Moorhead City, North Carolina.

“First of all, I tell you that, if nothing else, a great Atlantic hurricane will teach you humility. You’ll be caught in the whirlwinds, and you will not find charity or acts of mercy in any great cataclysm in nature, because those qualities are human qualities, they don’t exist in nature – love, mercy, concern for others – it’s not part of the natural order. You will, however, find in the midst of the whirlwind, a greater sense of your own small place in the universe. The best you’ll be able to do, and most of you know this already, is to prepare and then respond and then hope for better days.”

North Carolinians are no strangers to the devastations of the forces of nature. The hurricane services are a reminder to be prepared.

“The hurricane service acknowledges that the congregation and the larger community are moving into a very difficult time. We’ve had six hurricanes in this part of North Carolina during four years. We want to remind people about the dangers they face. We want them to be prepared. And we also want them to be concerned about each other, not just about fellow church members, but about what happens to the whole community.”

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

music

Hurricane Service

A fellowship service inspires human qualities in the face of natural disasters.
Air Date:06/22/2001
Scientist:
Transcript:


music
ambience: sermon choir

Well, the hurricane season looms, and those living in the east coast are readying for potential turbulent weather. They’re also getting some guidance from their local houses of worship. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Hurricanes are high intensity tropical cyclones that form each year in the Atlantic and elsewhere around the world. Churches up and down the eastern seaboard come together to pray for a quiet season, and to emphasize the need for communities to pull together in times of disaster. In years past, Reverend Robert Murphy held such services at the Unitarian Universalistic Church in Moorhead City, North Carolina.

"First of all, I tell you that, if nothing else, a great Atlantic hurricane will teach you humility. You’ll be caught in the whirlwinds, and you will not find charity or acts of mercy in any great cataclysm in nature, because those qualities are human qualities, they don’t exist in nature - love, mercy, concern for others - it’s not part of the natural order. You will, however, find in the midst of the whirlwind, a greater sense of your own small place in the universe. The best you’ll be able to do, and most of you know this already, is to prepare and then respond and then hope for better days."

North Carolinians are no strangers to the devastations of the forces of nature. The hurricane services are a reminder to be prepared.

"The hurricane service acknowledges that the congregation and the larger community are moving into a very difficult time. We’ve had six hurricanes in this part of North Carolina during four years. We want to remind people about the dangers they face. We want them to be prepared. And we also want them to be concerned about each other, not just about fellow church members, but about what happens to the whole community."

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

music