Georgia: Snapshot

We’re strolling through the red clay hills of northern Georgia, a landscape familiar to anyone who saw the movie “Gone with the Wind.” It’s an early morning in May, a quintessential spring day. Or is it? I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont. We’re with Jeff Jackson, a wildlife expert at the University of Georgia.

“Spring here starts at the winter solstice and we have all kinds of changes that you could call spring and now a lot of those things are fading away. The trees, nearly all of them, are in full leaf, so I’d call it summer.”

Perhaps the convenience of dividing up the year into separate seasons isn’t really all that true to life.

“The way I look at it is, each morning is unique in the 365 days of the year. There are no two exactly the same, and at this time of year it’s a good time of year for birds. And if you get up in the dark the way I did this morning, got out on the steps, at a certain point we heard whippoorwills, then we heard the last of the whippoorwills, also during the dark the barred owls, the yellow-breasted chat, then coming on were cardinals and wood peewees and wood thrushes and we gradually get more and more and until finally you can’t sort out all these noises, there are so many. But that’s today. If we do this again, in six weeks, it’ll be hard to hear all these birds, because of all the insects, we’ll hear katydids at night, we’ll hear cicadas in the day. So it’s kinda like photograph, you can’t sort of see spring all at one time. You’re catching just a little snapshot of it, and today we’re seeing it the way it is on this particular piece of land.”

Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I’m Jim Metzner.

Georgia: Snapshot

A Georgia wildlife expert demonstrates that there's no "typical" spring morning. What you see and hear in at any given moment is just a snapshot of a constantly changing world.
Air Date:05/12/2000
Scientist:
Transcript:

We're strolling through the red clay hills of northern Georgia, a landscape familiar to anyone who saw the movie "Gone with the Wind." It's an early morning in May, a quintessential spring day. Or is it? I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by DuPont. We're with Jeff Jackson, a wildlife expert at the University of Georgia.

"Spring here starts at the winter solstice and we have all kinds of changes that you could call spring and now a lot of those things are fading away. The trees, nearly all of them, are in full leaf, so I'd call it summer."

Perhaps the convenience of dividing up the year into separate seasons isn't really all that true to life.

"The way I look at it is, each morning is unique in the 365 days of the year. There are no two exactly the same, and at this time of year it's a good time of year for birds. And if you get up in the dark the way I did this morning, got out on the steps, at a certain point we heard whippoorwills, then we heard the last of the whippoorwills, also during the dark the barred owls, the yellow-breasted chat, then coming on were cardinals and wood peewees and wood thrushes and we gradually get more and more and until finally you can't sort out all these noises, there are so many. But that's today. If we do this again, in six weeks, it'll be hard to hear all these birds, because of all the insects, we'll hear katydids at night, we'll hear cicadas in the day. So it's kinda like photograph, you can't sort of see spring all at one time. You're catching just a little snapshot of it, and today we're seeing it the way it is on this particular piece of land."

Pulse of the Planet is presented by DuPont, bringing you the miracles of science, with additional support provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I'm Jim Metzner.