SEAWIFS -Earth from Space

In 1968, images from the Apollo 8 mission gave us our first view of the Earth, as seen from the surface of the moon. It’s a perspective that’s changed the way we think about our planet. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

“For years the astronauts have gone into space and looked back and been amazed by how beautiful the Earth is and it’s been sort of a spiritual awakening for them. And for years we at NASA have been monitoring the Earth, trying to understand how the atmosphere works, how the land is changing.”

Gene Feldman is an oceanographer with NASA’s SeaWiFS project. SeaWiFS, which stands for “Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor” is the name of a camera attached to a satellite presently in orbit around the Earth. Over the course of its five year mission, SeaWiFS will continue to transmit photographs of our planet back to NASA scientists.

“For the first time, we can view the living planet, and we can watch it change from day to day, we can watch it change over the seasons and if SeaWiFS continues to operate over its five year mission, we’ll actually be able to see how the Earth changes from year to year.”

The length of the SeaWiFS project will also allow NASA scientists to study how human activities affect the landscape.

“Humankind has the ability to really alter things on Earth. We can see that from space very clearly. You can watch deforestation in places that were once pristine. You can watch the growth of human population. It’s really important that we understand that we as a species have the ability to change the Earth. And it’s that interconectedness of our small world and a global world that I think satellite images really let people feel for the first time.”

Additional funding for Pulse of the Planet has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

SEAWIFS -Earth from Space

By positioning cameras far above the Earth, NASA gains a new perspective on how our actions affect the planet.
Air Date:06/14/1999
Scientist:
Transcript:

In 1968, images from the Apollo 8 mission gave us our first view of the Earth, as seen from the surface of the moon. It's a perspective that's changed the way we think about our planet. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

"For years the astronauts have gone into space and looked back and been amazed by how beautiful the Earth is and it's been sort of a spiritual awakening for them. And for years we at NASA have been monitoring the Earth, trying to understand how the atmosphere works, how the land is changing."

Gene Feldman is an oceanographer with NASA's SeaWiFS project. SeaWiFS, which stands for "Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor" is the name of a camera attached to a satellite presently in orbit around the Earth. Over the course of its five year mission, SeaWiFS will continue to transmit photographs of our planet back to NASA scientists.

"For the first time, we can view the living planet, and we can watch it change from day to day, we can watch it change over the seasons and if SeaWiFS continues to operate over its five year mission, we'll actually be able to see how the Earth changes from year to year."

The length of the SeaWiFS project will also allow NASA scientists to study how human activities affect the landscape.

"Humankind has the ability to really alter things on Earth. We can see that from space very clearly. You can watch deforestation in places that were once pristine. You can watch the growth of human population. It's really important that we understand that we as a species have the ability to change the Earth. And it's that interconectedness of our small world and a global world that I think satellite images really let people feel for the first time."

Additional funding for Pulse of the Planet has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.