MONARCHS- Folklore

According to the Blackfoot Indians, butterflies visit us at night carrying our dreams– in fact many Native American cultures have long considered the butterfly a symbol of the sacred and the unknown. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

We’re listening to the music of the Pueblo Indian Butterfly Dance, in which a woman, chosen by her community to play the part of the Butterfly Lady, dances with a male partner. With feasts, music and the Butterfly Dance, the Pueblo welcome rain and the coming of Spring.

This month, millions of Monarch butterflies will depart from the patches of Mexican forest where they’ve spent the winter clustered on the branches of fir trees. The Monarchs’ spring migration is so dependable that travelers in Central America this time of year have been told that if they find themselves lost and without a compass, to look to the skies and flying clusters of Monarch butterflies can reliably point the way northeast.

We’d like to hear about the events that herald the change of seasons in your neck of the woods. Please call our toll free number 1-877-PULSE-99, that’s toll-free 1-877-PULSE-99.

Our thanks to Canyon Records for the music of the Pueblo Indian Butterfly Dance.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. Additional funding for this series has been provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I’m Jim Metzner.

MONARCHS- Folklore

Among many native American groups, the butterfly is considered a symbol of the sacred and the unknown.
Air Date:03/17/1999
Scientist:
Transcript:

According to the Blackfoot Indians, butterflies visit us at night carrying our dreams-- in fact many Native American cultures have long considered the butterfly a symbol of the sacred and the unknown. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

We're listening to the music of the Pueblo Indian Butterfly Dance, in which a woman, chosen by her community to play the part of the Butterfly Lady, dances with a male partner. With feasts, music and the Butterfly Dance, the Pueblo welcome rain and the coming of Spring.

This month, millions of Monarch butterflies will depart from the patches of Mexican forest where they've spent the winter clustered on the branches of fir trees. The Monarchs' spring migration is so dependable that travelers in Central America this time of year have been told that if they find themselves lost and without a compass, to look to the skies and flying clusters of Monarch butterflies can reliably point the way northeast.

We'd like to hear about the events that herald the change of seasons in your neck of the woods. Please call our toll free number 1-877-PULSE-99, that's toll-free 1-877-PULSE-99.

Our thanks to Canyon Records for the music of the Pueblo Indian Butterfly Dance.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. Additional funding for this series has been provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. I'm Jim Metzner.