BIRD WATCHING-Perseverance

In the northeastern United States, it’s a little late in the season for bird watching. But, it’s still a great excuse to spend the day in the open air, and with a little patience and perseverance you sometimes get lucky. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

We’re on an early morning walk with a group of bird watchers at the Pocono Environmental Education Center in Pennsylvania.

ambience: imitating bird calls

Now that’s not a bird. It’s Joe DiCostanzo, President of the Linnean Society of New York, demonstrating one of the tricks that bird watchers have up their sleeves. He’s trying to attract a Kinglet a little closer to our group.

“The chhching is just to make them curious, to come see what it’s all about. Kinglets are usually much more inquisitive than this. Pss pss.”

As the day grows warmer, we make a few sightings — and a few more near misses.

“Now you see that very skinny pine with the bark missing? Go up that trunk, quite a ways now, about 10 feet. And he’s still moving up on the left side of it now. He’s now just a silhouette against the sky, up near the top. Oops. He just flew.”

And then, it’s on to higher ground to search the skies for the silhouettes of hawks and other birds of prey.

ambience: bird watching

Please visit our web site at www.pulseplanet.com.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. Additional funding for this series has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I’m Jim Metzner.

BIRD WATCHING-Perseverance

A group of early morning bird watchers meets with mixed success.
Air Date:11/03/1998
Scientist:
Transcript:

In the northeastern United States, it's a little late in the season for bird watching. But, it's still a great excuse to spend the day in the open air, and with a little patience and perseverance you sometimes get lucky. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.

We're on an early morning walk with a group of bird watchers at the Pocono Environmental Education Center in Pennsylvania.

ambience: imitating bird calls

Now that's not a bird. It's Joe DiCostanzo, President of the Linnean Society of New York, demonstrating one of the tricks that bird watchers have up their sleeves. He's trying to attract a Kinglet a little closer to our group.

"The chhching is just to make them curious, to come see what it's all about. Kinglets are usually much more inquisitive than this. Pss pss."

As the day grows warmer, we make a few sightings -- and a few more near misses.

"Now you see that very skinny pine with the bark missing? Go up that trunk, quite a ways now, about 10 feet. And he's still moving up on the left side of it now. He's now just a silhouette against the sky, up near the top. Oops. He just flew."

And then, it's on to higher ground to search the skies for the silhouettes of hawks and other birds of prey.

ambience: bird watching

Please visit our web site at www.pulseplanet.com.

Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. Additional funding for this series has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm Jim Metzner.