Everyone’s Invited

WESTERN TURKEY – Moveable FeastsHere’s a program from our archives. Ambience:: Turkish MusicThis time of year in Turkey, it’s the start of the season for celebrating weddings and circumcisions. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Plane. In the town of Koolah, in Western Turkey, a celebration might well begin in someone’s courtyard.Akkurt: This interior court becomes the area where they hold weddings, they hold circumcision celebrations, and if the invitees are more than they can handle in this given space, then they spill out onto the streets. So streets become the expansion of the houses or of the courtyards.Professor Cigdem Akkurt is a principal investigator with the Earthwatch Institute.Akkurt: In Koolah, weddings are still very important social gatherings and usually they last about two or three days. And the whole neighborhood gets together – it’s amazing – the women of the neighborhood will get together in one of the interior court and prepare the food in big containers. The day of the wedding, they put round tubs on top of legs out on the streets. And the whole neighborhood is invited. So it’s not only by invitation; anybody who goes by has to stop and take it. And everybody eats from the same bowl. It’s a shared thing. They are very informal; they use newspapers for the tablecloth, but everybody is there, children, older people, women, men. So it’s their way of sharing and celebrating the occasion.For transcripts of this and other programs in our series, please visit our web site at www.pulseplanet.com We’ve been listening to a program from our archives. If you want to hear more, check out our podcast.

Everyone's Invited

In Turkish cities, wedding celebrations may begin in a courtyard, but they'll soon spill out into the streets.
Air Date:03/13/2020
Scientist:
Transcript:

WESTERN TURKEY - Moveable FeastsHere's a program from our archives. Ambience:: Turkish MusicThis time of year in Turkey, it's the start of the season for celebrating weddings and circumcisions. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Plane. In the town of Koolah, in Western Turkey, a celebration might well begin in someone's courtyard.Akkurt: This interior court becomes the area where they hold weddings, they hold circumcision celebrations, and if the invitees are more than they can handle in this given space, then they spill out onto the streets. So streets become the expansion of the houses or of the courtyards.Professor Cigdem Akkurt is a principal investigator with the Earthwatch Institute.Akkurt: In Koolah, weddings are still very important social gatherings and usually they last about two or three days. And the whole neighborhood gets together - it's amazing - the women of the neighborhood will get together in one of the interior court and prepare the food in big containers. The day of the wedding, they put round tubs on top of legs out on the streets. And the whole neighborhood is invited. So it's not only by invitation; anybody who goes by has to stop and take it. And everybody eats from the same bowl. It's a shared thing. They are very informal; they use newspapers for the tablecloth, but everybody is there, children, older people, women, men. So it's their way of sharing and celebrating the occasion.For transcripts of this and other programs in our series, please visit our web site at www.pulseplanet.com We've been listening to a program from our archives. If you want to hear more, check out our podcast.