Hajj: Sacred Gathering

THE HAJ – Sacred Gatheringambience: Call to PrayerThis week, the Haj – the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, takes place in Saudia Arabia. Up to two million Muslims from all over the world participate in a series of rituals and prayers, which transcend the barriers of caste, color, race and gender. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.Habib Diab Ghanim, a Lebanese Muslim, describes what it’s like to take part in the the Haj.”Millions of people come, by air, by sea, by land, any way you can think of. They come together: people of all nationalities, all races, all colors, short, tall. You don’t know who this one is, whether he’s rich, whether he’s poor, whether he’s sick, whether he’s a leper. Everybody is equal; that’s how you feel. Nobody is a president, or nobody is a servant; everybody is equal and you feel that calmness. When you are in Makkah, doing the pilgrimage, you don’t even carry any ID. Nothing. Just the way God made you, except for the garb that you put on, for the men. So you are doing this in the name of God and trying to answer to his call. That’s why we say: Labbayk, Allahuma Labbayk. Labbayk, La shareeka laka, Labbayk. Innal-hamda wan-n’imata laka walmulk La shareeka lak.” The words mean, “Here I am, Oh God. Here I am, answering your call with pleasure. There is no other in my thoughts but you.””You see others, you just know that nobody is better than anybody else. You just feel that we are all humans and this religion is not for only one race or people. It’s for everybody.” Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. I’m Jim Metzner.

Hajj: Sacred Gathering

Millions of Muslim pilgrims gather this week in Mecca, in a gathering which transcends the barriers of caste, color, race and gender.
Air Date:07/20/2021
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THE HAJ - Sacred Gatheringambience: Call to PrayerThis week, the Haj - the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, takes place in Saudia Arabia. Up to two million Muslims from all over the world participate in a series of rituals and prayers, which transcend the barriers of caste, color, race and gender. I'm Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet, presented by the American Museum of Natural History.Habib Diab Ghanim, a Lebanese Muslim, describes what it's like to take part in the the Haj."Millions of people come, by air, by sea, by land, any way you can think of. They come together: people of all nationalities, all races, all colors, short, tall. You don't know who this one is, whether he's rich, whether he's poor, whether he's sick, whether he's a leper. Everybody is equal; that's how you feel. Nobody is a president, or nobody is a servant; everybody is equal and you feel that calmness. When you are in Makkah, doing the pilgrimage, you don't even carry any ID. Nothing. Just the way God made you, except for the garb that you put on, for the men. So you are doing this in the name of God and trying to answer to his call. That's why we say: Labbayk, Allahuma Labbayk. Labbayk, La shareeka laka, Labbayk. Innal-hamda wan-n'imata laka walmulk La shareeka lak." The words mean, "Here I am, Oh God. Here I am, answering your call with pleasure. There is no other in my thoughts but you.""You see others, you just know that nobody is better than anybody else. You just feel that we are all humans and this religion is not for only one race or people. It's for everybody." Pulse of the Planet is presented by the American Museum of Natural History. I'm Jim Metzner.