Returning Home

ABORIGINALS OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA 3 – Homelandsmusic of the Pintobee peopleHere’s a program from our archives.In the 1950’s, the Australian government started relocating many groups of aboriginal peoples from their ancestral lands. Twenty years ago, a movement began which encouraged the return of native Australians to their homelands. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Myers: The homelands movement was one in which aboriginal people were allowed or at least not prevented from moving back to their own traditional countries.Fred Myers is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at New York University.We’re listening to songs of the Pintobee people, which Professor Myers recorded in the western desert region of Australia.Myers: Many aboriginal people on the fringes of the western desert have moved back gradually and in steps and starts to sites in their own country where they are living with close kin in relatively small groups. They depend very heavily on supplies from the outside. They depend on water that comes from wells and windmills. They depend on medical services that are supplied by the government in one way or another. And within that context, it’s the older people who most wanted to move back to their own country to be able to pass on the tradition to their sons and daughters. Many of the younger people want to keep some distance from white society as a whole, but they want to embrace certain dimensions of it which they find attractive.”This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Returning Home

Decades after a government program removed them from their lands, some of Australia's indigenous peoples have returned to their traditional homes. This archival program is part of our 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:07/24/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

ABORIGINALS OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA 3 - Homelandsmusic of the Pintobee peopleHere's a program from our archives.In the 1950's, the Australian government started relocating many groups of aboriginal peoples from their ancestral lands. Twenty years ago, a movement began which encouraged the return of native Australians to their homelands. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Myers: The homelands movement was one in which aboriginal people were allowed or at least not prevented from moving back to their own traditional countries.Fred Myers is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at New York University.We're listening to songs of the Pintobee people, which Professor Myers recorded in the western desert region of Australia.Myers: Many aboriginal people on the fringes of the western desert have moved back gradually and in steps and starts to sites in their own country where they are living with close kin in relatively small groups. They depend very heavily on supplies from the outside. They depend on water that comes from wells and windmills. They depend on medical services that are supplied by the government in one way or another. And within that context, it's the older people who most wanted to move back to their own country to be able to pass on the tradition to their sons and daughters. Many of the younger people want to keep some distance from white society as a whole, but they want to embrace certain dimensions of it which they find attractive."This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.