Foraging Central Park

Foraging Central ParkCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.For years, Steve Brill has been one of New York City’s most popular tour guides. He’s a self-taught expert on edible wild plants, and he finds them in the city’s parks. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Brill: This is called purslane. It has paddle shaped leaves. The leaves have no stalks on them. The stem is red and succulent. Once you learn a plant, you see it all over the place. This is the wineberry. It’s an ancient species of raspberry, and it has fruit on it in July which is delicious. It’s an extremely common plant and very, very delicious.”Marvin just made a classic error. He uprooted the plant.I started doing this as a hobby and it just got more and more intriguing and interesting. I just got drawn into it more and more. I decided why don’t I try and share it with people. It takes time and you can’t eat anything you haven’t identified with 100 percent certainty. And there are plants this year that we’re eating for the first time that I’ve known for ten years, and was afraid to eat. It’s not just picking. I want people to be familiar with their environment, enjoy the renewable resources, and do what they can to protect the non-renewable resources. Ignorance of environment issues and ignorance of what is actually in the environment and how people can relate to it, is a big enemy of the conservation effort. We have walks from the beginning of March right down through the beginning of December. And we find enough to supplement our diet, very nutritious, all picked in clean areas.Once we finish with the Poor Man’s Pepper and the elderberries, we’re going to be heading back out.Steve Brill reminds us that unless you know what you’re doing, it’s not a good idea to pick and eat any wild plants, especially mushrooms.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Foraging Central Park

Harvesting culinary delights in the wilds of New York City parks. This archival program is part of our 30th anniversary celebration.
Air Date:07/19/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Foraging Central ParkCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.For years, Steve Brill has been one of New York City's most popular tour guides. He's a self-taught expert on edible wild plants, and he finds them in the city's parks. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Brill: This is called purslane. It has paddle shaped leaves. The leaves have no stalks on them. The stem is red and succulent. Once you learn a plant, you see it all over the place. This is the wineberry. It's an ancient species of raspberry, and it has fruit on it in July which is delicious. It's an extremely common plant and very, very delicious."Marvin just made a classic error. He uprooted the plant.I started doing this as a hobby and it just got more and more intriguing and interesting. I just got drawn into it more and more. I decided why don't I try and share it with people. It takes time and you can't eat anything you haven't identified with 100 percent certainty. And there are plants this year that we're eating for the first time that I've known for ten years, and was afraid to eat. It's not just picking. I want people to be familiar with their environment, enjoy the renewable resources, and do what they can to protect the non-renewable resources. Ignorance of environment issues and ignorance of what is actually in the environment and how people can relate to it, is a big enemy of the conservation effort. We have walks from the beginning of March right down through the beginning of December. And we find enough to supplement our diet, very nutritious, all picked in clean areas.Once we finish with the Poor Man's Pepper and the elderberries, we're going to be heading back out.Steve Brill reminds us that unless you know what you're doing, it's not a good idea to pick and eat any wild plants, especially mushrooms.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.