Feared by Day, Stalked by Night

Feared by Day, Stalked at NightAmbience, leopards, baboons Celebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.In the wild, the balance of power between two species can shift as easily as night and day. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.We’re listening to the sounds of leopards.Cavallo: There’s a unique day and night shift in species dominance among leopards and baboons. By that I mean, during the day, an adult leopard can be in a tree, a troupe of baboons can be moving along the river, in search of food and water, spot that leopard, and automatically will go after it. They will mob it. They’ll chase the leopard. The leopard usually never gives them the chance to get too close, because the leopard will just drop out of the tree and run for its life. John Cavallo is a paleoanthropologist at Rutgers University. The sounds we’re listening to now are baboons. Cavallo: Leopards are known to have been not only mobbed, but injured by baboons because male baboons have very large canine teeth. So leopards are fearful of baboons during the day. But at night, something interesting happens. Baboons will stop their foraging late in the afternoon, and then make their way back to a sleeping grove, and they’ll climb the trees, where they’ll stay for the night. And during the night, leopards will come up into these trees and kill baboons without any problem at all. So there’s this really interesting day and night shift in species dominance.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Feared by Day, Stalked by Night

The balance of power between two species can shift when the sun goes down. This archival program is part of our 30th anniversary celebration. Anthropologist John Cavallo's (1939-2009) work spanned many disciplines. He was the Director of the Rutgers' Center for Public Archaeology.
Air Date:07/18/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Feared by Day, Stalked at NightAmbience, leopards, baboons Celebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.In the wild, the balance of power between two species can shift as easily as night and day. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.We're listening to the sounds of leopards.Cavallo: There's a unique day and night shift in species dominance among leopards and baboons. By that I mean, during the day, an adult leopard can be in a tree, a troupe of baboons can be moving along the river, in search of food and water, spot that leopard, and automatically will go after it. They will mob it. They'll chase the leopard. The leopard usually never gives them the chance to get too close, because the leopard will just drop out of the tree and run for its life. John Cavallo is a paleoanthropologist at Rutgers University. The sounds we're listening to now are baboons. Cavallo: Leopards are known to have been not only mobbed, but injured by baboons because male baboons have very large canine teeth. So leopards are fearful of baboons during the day. But at night, something interesting happens. Baboons will stop their foraging late in the afternoon, and then make their way back to a sleeping grove, and they'll climb the trees, where they'll stay for the night. And during the night, leopards will come up into these trees and kill baboons without any problem at all. So there's this really interesting day and night shift in species dominance.This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.