GAIA

GaiaCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.The more that’s discovered about the workings of our planet, the more we learn about the the interrelationship between ecosystems and lifeforms. This study has led to a hypothesis named after the ancient Greek goddess of the earth, Gaia. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Margulis: “The Gaia hypothesis recognizes that the earth’s surface is a living system, not a single organism, but a living system. The chemical composition, the acidity, alkalinity, oxygen concentration and temperature of the surface of the planet are actively regulated by the live organisms on the surface.” Lynn Margulis is a professor at the University of Massachusetts, and, along with James Lovelock, a co-developer of the Gaia hypothesis.Margulis: “In the middle of winter in Minnesota where the temperature’s minus thirty degrees, the temperature in a hive with live bees can be plus twenty five degrees centigrade. Because the bees, by constant, incessant activity, make a difference in the temperature of fifty or sixty degrees.” Now keeping the beehive in mind, according to the Gaia hypothesis, many factors, including plant and animal life, contribute to planetary phenomena, such as the regulation of the temperature of the surface of the earth.Margulis: “Thirty million species of organisms interacting in all kinds of ways, including flapping their wings, and changing their color, and moving particles of dust into the atmosphere, and all sorts of other myriads of mechanisms, are involved in temperature regulation on the surface of the earth. And in standard ecology, all of these organisms are growing independently and not interacting. On a Gaian view, it’s recognized that no organism is independent and they’re always interacting with each other. Their interaction leads to this regulatory phenomena.” This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

GAIA

The earth is a living system. This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration. Famed biologist, theorist, educator and author Lynn Margulis (1938-2011) co-developed the Gaia Hypothesis.
Air Date:06/19/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

GaiaCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.The more that's discovered about the workings of our planet, the more we learn about the the interrelationship between ecosystems and lifeforms. This study has led to a hypothesis named after the ancient Greek goddess of the earth, Gaia. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.Margulis: "The Gaia hypothesis recognizes that the earth's surface is a living system, not a single organism, but a living system. The chemical composition, the acidity, alkalinity, oxygen concentration and temperature of the surface of the planet are actively regulated by the live organisms on the surface." Lynn Margulis is a professor at the University of Massachusetts, and, along with James Lovelock, a co-developer of the Gaia hypothesis.Margulis: "In the middle of winter in Minnesota where the temperature's minus thirty degrees, the temperature in a hive with live bees can be plus twenty five degrees centigrade. Because the bees, by constant, incessant activity, make a difference in the temperature of fifty or sixty degrees." Now keeping the beehive in mind, according to the Gaia hypothesis, many factors, including plant and animal life, contribute to planetary phenomena, such as the regulation of the temperature of the surface of the earth.Margulis: "Thirty million species of organisms interacting in all kinds of ways, including flapping their wings, and changing their color, and moving particles of dust into the atmosphere, and all sorts of other myriads of mechanisms, are involved in temperature regulation on the surface of the earth. And in standard ecology, all of these organisms are growing independently and not interacting. On a Gaian view, it's recognized that no organism is independent and they're always interacting with each other. Their interaction leads to this regulatory phenomena." This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.