Protecting Animals and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Protecting Animals and the Rights of Indigenous PeoplesCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.The creation of wildlife conservation areas in Africa has helped save endangered species and promote tourism. But how has this affected the lives of indigenous peoples? I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.The sounds of Maasai women singing as their cattle is called out to graze. For many years, the Maasai have moved their herds throughout East Africa. But the creation of wildlife refuges has denied them access to their traditional grazing lands. Moringe Parkipuny represents the Maasai as a member of the Tanzanian parliament.(Parkipuny) “More than 50% of the world’s animals found in Kenya and Tanzania are within the Maasai area.”Conservation areas have been set up for wildlife and tourism, but in Tanzania, the Maasai have been excluded from these parks.(Parkipuny) “The traditional rights of the Maasai to graze in those areas have been abolished, but the wild animals which are in the parks are free to move out into what used to be common grazing areas with the Maasai cattle.” “What the Maasai want is for the authorities to recognize their existence as a people with a valid cultural identity, and a process of dialogue which would result both in resolving the grievances of the Maasai and insuring the survival of the wildlife resource in the area.” This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Protecting Animals and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

In Africa, wildlife conservation areas are saving endangered species while denying indigenous peoples access to their traditional lands. This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration.Moringe Parkipuny (1948 - 2013) was a parlimentarian, activist and indigenous spokesperson.
Air Date:06/22/2018
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Transcript:

Protecting Animals and the Rights of Indigenous PeoplesCelebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.The creation of wildlife conservation areas in Africa has helped save endangered species and promote tourism. But how has this affected the lives of indigenous peoples? I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.The sounds of Maasai women singing as their cattle is called out to graze. For many years, the Maasai have moved their herds throughout East Africa. But the creation of wildlife refuges has denied them access to their traditional grazing lands. Moringe Parkipuny represents the Maasai as a member of the Tanzanian parliament.(Parkipuny) "More than 50% of the world's animals found in Kenya and Tanzania are within the Maasai area."Conservation areas have been set up for wildlife and tourism, but in Tanzania, the Maasai have been excluded from these parks.(Parkipuny) "The traditional rights of the Maasai to graze in those areas have been abolished, but the wild animals which are in the parks are free to move out into what used to be common grazing areas with the Maasai cattle." "What the Maasai want is for the authorities to recognize their existence as a people with a valid cultural identity, and a process of dialogue which would result both in resolving the grievances of the Maasai and insuring the survival of the wildlife resource in the area." This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.