Nomads of East Africa

Celebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here’s a program from our archives.The Maasai live in East Africa. They’re a semi-nomadic people, who raise herds of cattle and other livestock. Traditionally, the Maasai have grazed their herds on a variety of pasture lands. Slowly but surely, their use of these lands is being restricted. I’m Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience, Maasai men whistling to cattleThe sounds of Maasai men whistling to their cattle to call them out to graze.(Parkipuny) “The Maasai production system basically depends on rotational grazing that can sustain livestock throughout the wet season and through the very hard time of the dry season and if not properly managed can lead to heavy losses of livestock.”Moringe Parkipuny represents the Maasai community as a member of the Tanzanian parliament.(Parkipuny) “So what happened since the beginning of colonization is that the high potential grazing areas which were used during the hot dry season have all been taken over and put to other uses. The process began in the first decade of this century, with the coming of settlers into Kenya Maasai land where they took over more than fifty percent of the Maasai territory.”This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.

Nomads of East Africa

For centuries, the Maasai have herded their cattle throughout East Africa, but their use of traditional grazing lands is being restricted. This archival program is part of Pulse of the Planet's 30th anniversary celebration. Moringe Parkipuny (1948 - 2013) was a parlimentarian, activist and indigenous spokesperson.
Air Date:06/21/2018
Scientist:
Transcript:

Celebrating three decades of Pulse of the Planet, here's a program from our archives.The Maasai live in East Africa. They're a semi-nomadic people, who raise herds of cattle and other livestock. Traditionally, the Maasai have grazed their herds on a variety of pasture lands. Slowly but surely, their use of these lands is being restricted. I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.ambience, Maasai men whistling to cattleThe sounds of Maasai men whistling to their cattle to call them out to graze.(Parkipuny) "The Maasai production system basically depends on rotational grazing that can sustain livestock throughout the wet season and through the very hard time of the dry season and if not properly managed can lead to heavy losses of livestock."Moringe Parkipuny represents the Maasai community as a member of the Tanzanian parliament.(Parkipuny) "So what happened since the beginning of colonization is that the high potential grazing areas which were used during the hot dry season have all been taken over and put to other uses. The process began in the first decade of this century, with the coming of settlers into Kenya Maasai land where they took over more than fifty percent of the Maasai territory."This archival program is part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration. Im Jim Metzner and this is the Pulse of the Planet.